Last weekend I did the ten gallon batch of Extra Pale Ale, and pitched different yeast strains in each carboy. I thought I’d throw out an update to that brew day, since I kegged it all last night. The strains I used, Pacman, and Wyeast 1056 American Ale, aren’t really all that different, in fact I’ve read that Pacman (which is a proprietary yeast of Rogue) is a mutated strain of 1056. So I wasn’t really expecting too many differences between the two. What came to be was somewhat surprising and expected.

Due to the loss of wort in the kettle (which I have now solved with a pickup tube bought from bargainfittings.com), I only ended up with around 8 gallons. The 1056 American Ale yeast came from a Propagator smack pack, and pitched into a 750ml yeast starter. The Pacman came straight from the Activator smack pack, no starter. I thought I’d throw the Pacman yeast into the carboy with less wort in it, since the 1056 starter had a pretty healthy supply of yeast at the bottom of the flask, and would be better suited for the full 5 gallon carboy. I pitched both in the afternoon, and by bedtime, there was some bubbling in both airlocks. By noon the next day, a low, thick krausen. By Wednesday evening, both beers were finished fermenting, and by Friday, all krausen was gone. Consecutive gravity reading showed fermentation was done, so last night I racked them both into kegs.

The initial gravity reading before fermentation was 1.045. The beers then took a similar, yet slightly different path. The Pacman finished out at 1.012 (4.3% ABV), and the 1056 finished at 1.010 (4.6% ABV). Now, the 1056 had a starter, and more yeast, but it also had more volume. The Pacman¬† finished faster, but the attenuation wasn’t as high. Also, the Pacman beer seemed a slight bit darker. The taste? They both tasted the same to me. Light, crisp, and very hoppy. Both batches were racked to a keg for some conditioning and clearing. Should be interesting.

Here’s a side by side comparison of the two. On the left is the beer fermented with the Pacman yeast, on the right, the 1056. The one on the left seems a tad darker and clearer.